The Steve Marinak Interview in Coping Block!

                                                    Steve Marinak pulling an Andrect handplant.



Steve you’ve been skating for some time now, when did it all begin for you?

I started with a clay wheeled Super Surfer in the early 1970’s, a short time after that urethane wheels came on to the market as replacement wheels, they were an amazing improvement.  Small cracks in the sidewalk, or those mini pinecones from Australian pine trees were no longer a death sentence.  I grew up near Singer Island and Juno Beach, both surfing towns in the 1970’s.  The older neighborhood kids were surfers and I primarily skateboarded more than they did, since I was so young I did not drive or go the beach with them.  However, their Surfer Magazines would show a random picture of a skateboarder now and then. Along with that small ADS were now starting to appear in Surfer, like Bahne Skateboards.  Guys like Bruce Logan and Dennis Shufeldt were early skaters in these photos.  I would whip through Surfer Magazine to find one or two skate pictures or ADS and realized that there were others out there with the same passion for skateboarding.  Then finally one day, in Surfer Magazine an AD appeared that they would have a premier issue that would cater to skaters, it was naturally called Skateboarder Magazine.  I signed up for a subscription before it ever hit the newsstands and never missed an issue all the way until it’s demise after it morphed into Action Now.
I got my first issue in 1974; I was ten years old and knew I had found my calling. I was a Skateboarder.


Who were the main skaters in your skate crew, and are you still skating with any of them today?

Skateboard Safari was my local skate park. The skaters from my area called that their home skate park.  However, it closed in the late 1970’s as so many other parks during that era.  The remaining core skaters turned to backyard ramps in the late 1970’s as so many other parks during that era. The remaining core skaters turned to back yard ramps in the late 1970’s, and early 1980’s.  The crew that I skated with locally included Pat Love, Scott McCranels, Johnny Miller, Bob Beebe, and Mike Folmer when he was in town.  A little north of us were Mark Buncy, Ronnie Lowe and Mike Kentner. I still talk to many of these guys, I consider them some of my best friends I have ever had.  Buncy still kills it.  Bob Beebe is still skating regularly. Johnny Miller got back into it for a short stint and was doing all of his old tricks over forty.
                                              
                                                      Steve and part of his skate crew.



Obviously you love skateboarding, but if you could narrow down three things you really love about the sport what would they be?

1.     Freedom.  Skateboarding frees your mind. It allows you to completely escape into an age-less, worry free zone for that moment in time.

2.     Creativity. Skateboarding assists your mind to think creatively beyond the act of skateboarding. It has opened doors for me in all areas of my life allowing me to believe anything is possible and attain goals with the same methodology as learning a new trick.

3.     Physical rush. There are a few other sports I also do like surfing, or snowboarding, that offer a similar type of physical adrenaline rush. However, those other sports take a little more preparation and gear.  The simplicity of grabbing a board slapping it down and rolling down your driveway can be had by almost everyone. A good skate session or a simple cruise down the street can offer you a thrilling feeling that more people should experience in life. Push, Carve, and Grind, as you have eloquently put it captures this spirit.

You’ve seen a lot of skate parks come and go, which of the now defunct parks stick out in your memory as being the best in the bay area?

At fourteen, I skated in the second Clearwater Skate Park Sun & Fun contest, road tripped with the Sundancer skateboard team out of Lake Worth, Florida. That was one of the great Florida Skate Parks, maybe not because of the terrain, but Muriel Yantis efforts to create such well attended skate events.  She managed to get a lot of print space in Skateboarder Magazine as well.  Hats off to Muriel for putting us on the map!  I attended USF in Tampa from 1982 –1987. During that time we would skate the Bro Bowl, Grigley’s Ramp, and the Brandon Ramp. Each of those places had their own vibe and special ness.  At one of the bigger St. Pete Ramp Jam’s at Grigley’s house, I decided to go cheap and camp in my VW Van in the lot across from his house. It turned out to be one of the coldest nights in many years. I’m not even sure I had any sheets, let alone blankets. I put on all my pads, and any clothing I had, helmet, the whole deal. I can still feel the chill in my bones, LOL!

                              Steve re-enters the ramp during the Florida Backyard Ramp Series.


What would you suggest to a community that’s currently contemplating building a concrete park?


Since I have three kids and have brought them to parks through the years. I notice it is very intimidating for novice skaters to show up to a skate park, let alone drop in.  I would like to see some rounded lip areas for the younger kids to simply roll in and get comfortable pumping and throwing their weight, carving, and having fun.

You must have had a dream set up back in the day? What would have been your ideal deck to ride and what were you skating on back then?


Each era had their special setups. Here are some of my favorites.  The first board I earned money to purchase was a 1973 Bahne with Cadillac Wheels.  The skinny Bahne with the block lettering before they goofed up and tried to make their own trucks and changed the wheel formula.  Road Rider 4 wheels with precision bearings were like riding a cloud; the first thing you would notice is the quiet ride and whoosh feeling.  In the mid 1970’s the Sims Taperkick was just a beautiful piece of woodwork, I still have mine and I still see some on ebay that I would love to have, but they are pricey.  Around 1977 Powerflex 5’s dominated all wheels, they had a good shape and size, they were fast, and they came in multiple colors too, a very 70’s thing.  The Sims Lonnie Toft was a must have deck.  I would bet they sold a ton of those models. I had one for a very short period prior to getting sponsored by Sundancer in 1978.  I do wish I kept that board; it had white Sims Snake wheels on it.  After Sundancer, I rode a Sims Mike Folmer model as we (Pat Love, Johnny Miller, and Scott McCranels) all rode for Sims.  I was finally on the dream team…then I got a letter from Sims that they sold the company to Brad Dorfman and all team product would halt until they settled things out.  At that time we hooked up with Walker Skateboards and we all rode Mark lake Models.  Both the Folmer and the Lake boards were a little smaller than the gigantic pig boards of the day.  Shortly after that FOX decided to get back into selling their own brand, they approached us as a local team, offered Pat a signature model and we decided to help endorse those efforts as a group.  The boards were actually Powell Mike McGill decks. Powell would screen them with the FOX Pat Love graphic.

What impresses you most about the skating you are witnessing today?

The first thing that comes to mind is Bob Burnquist and his mega ramp. That guy’s brain has gone to the outer limits and he’s got the skills to fulfill his dreams.



Who are your favorite skaters of all-time?

 I’ll steal one of Folmer’s quotes in a past Floridaskater.com interview. “Any Florida skater that has left blood in some Crete.”

What group of Florida skaters do you think had or have the greatest impact on skateboarding nationally?

Every skater in the Florida Skateboard Hall of Fame has made an impact. We are working on some really exciting stuff for the Hall of Fame. The future of the HOF will be great!

How did Florida Skater on-line come about?

Floridaskater.com came about because I wanted to reunite all Florida skateboarders from back in the day.  Along with that I felt that we never got the amount of recognition the Cal skaters got due to our location.  So I wanted to give something back to the guys I looked up to, and friends I skated with.  We had our first event at Kona Skate Park in Jacksonville in 2001. We had hundreds of skaters show up from all over the country and the world.  It was an amazing turnout. We realized then we were on to something and created the Florida Skateboard Hall of Fame.



What skate parks still in existence do you want to skate?

Still in existence? The only two I know of are Kona and the Bro Bowl, both two of my favorites.  Ones that are gone and I’d like to skate are Cherry Hill, Upland, Del Mar, Marina Del Ray, Whittier, oh and if I had a time machine I’d really like to ride the Kentner Banks with the Z-Boys, Carlsbad with Greg Weaver, and the Dog Bowl with TA, just for historic thrills.

What do you think the future of Skateboarding is?

It has definitely eclipsed surfing as far as size. The sky is the limit.

What was your favorite Old School Skate AD?

The Cadillac Wheels ADS were cool.  Plus the Sims ADS were really nice, like the ones with Dave Andrecht, green wheels glowing, wide-angle lens.




Now quickly, Van’s or Nike SB’s?

I’ve always worn Vans, but those Lance Mountain Nike Hi tops are looking pretty cool; I may have to get me some.

Old school bowl rider deck, or Popsicle stick?

My custom Deckcrafters! It’s a great blend of Popsicle stick with length and width I want. Plus the quality can’t be beat.

Steel or Cement coping?

CEMENT.

Put the following in order of preference:
A)    Stacy Dash
B)    Marisa Miller
C)    Summer Glau
D)   Michelle Zen

I must be getting old. I don’t even know who these girls are! LOL!
My wife is #1 in my book. As Ricky Bobby would say, “she’s smoking’ hot”!

Good answer! Just checking Steve, just checking…


Push, Carve, Grind!

For more great Skateboarding stories please visit http://www.copingblock.com/

The Chuck Treece Interview in Coping Block!

                                                                      


Chuck it’s been a long time since I’ve seen you man! I think the last time was some thirty years ago!  We can’t let stuff like that go on.
 Let’s sort out your origins first, where’s your hometown?


PHILLY, PA NORTHERN LIBERTIES. ORIGINAL START WAS IN WILMINGTON, DELAWARE.


When did skateboarding first catch your eye?

SKATEBOARDING GOT A HOLD OF ME WHEN I WAS ABOUT 11..THE ONLY SKATEBOARDS I SAW IN THE HOOD WHERE THE ONES WITH METAL WHEELS, NO GRIP TAPE AND SMALL...I WOULD HOLD ON TO A WALL AND TEACH MYSELF HOW TO MOVE AROUND ON THE DECK..I MOVED TO THE SUBURBS OF NEWARK, DE AND A KID RODE BY ON A BETTER STYLE OF SKATEBOARD AND I ASKED MY DAD TO GET ME ONE...15 BUCKS WAS SPENT ON THE SK8DECK AND I TOOK IT TO THE STREETS OF MY NEW LIFE IN THE SUBURBS..I WAS 13 YEARS OS AGE..I HAVE BEEN ON MY SKATEBOARD EVER SINCE...STOKED ON THE START OF WHAT WE ALL CREATED IN SKATING..THE FIRST KNEE SCRAPE GAVE ME A SENSE OF BEING ATTACHED TO MY SKATEBOARD.

What was your first setup?

MY FIRST SET WAS A NO NAME BRAND SKATEDECK.THEN I MOVED TO A NEWPORT SLOLOM DECK AND THEN TO A SIMS WOODKICK KICK,TRACKER TRUCKS AND BLUE KRYPTONICS.

I know you had a dream skateboard setup back in the day, what was it?

I LIKE THE POWELL BEAMERS..I WAS SO STOKED TO HAVE ONE,RIDE ONE AND ALSO GET FIBERGLASS IN MY ARMS FROM CARRYING THE DECK AROUND..THE FIRST DECK THAT MOST OF MY FRIENDS WANTED WAS THE TONY ALVA DECK..I HAD ONE OF THOSE ALSO ALONG WITH THE MULTI COLOR WHEEL OPTIONS THAT ALVA RELEASED...SO STOKED ON THOSE DAYS....EASY RIDER SK8PARK DAZE..ME AND PEANUT BROWN...

Was your neighborhood cool with you skateboarding?

MY NEIGHBORHOOD WAS AMAZING FOR SKATEBOARDING..WE HAD THE MEADOWOOD SHOPPING CENTER TO SESSION..I SKATED WITH TONY SANTORO AND JOEY W.I ALSO SKATED MY FIRST BACKYARD RAMP WITH ROB WHITE.R.I.P.IT WAS RIGHT DOWN THE STREET FROM MY HOUSW..WE HAD TO PUSH FROM THE OTHER NEIGHBORS YARD TO GET UP ENUFF SPEED..NO TRANNY JUST A SLANTED WALL..THAT'S WHERE I LEARNED EVERYTHING BEFORE WE ALL STARTED SKATING EASY RIDER SK8 PARK IN WILMINGTON, DELAWARE.

Breakdown the names of your original skate crew for us?

TONY SANTORO
ROB WHITE
JOEY WAZ
PHILLIP MALLET PREVO
BOBBY REEVES
PEANUT BROWN
WOODSMAN FROM CONCORD DELAWARE
TODD WERNY
TOM GROHOLSKI
JIM MURPHY
STEVE HEARING
JEFF HARTSEL
JAMIE GODFREY
MIKE JESOLOWSKI
VICTOR PEREZ
TED GUENIVER
MARK GERMACK
MARK MANUTI so many others also..so many good firends who gave me support and great times searching for sk8 spots and searching for our youth....


                                          Chuck Treece early dayz street plant.


What was the next closest skate scene to your own and who were some of those skaters?

THE CLOSEST SKA8 SCENE WAS CHERRYHILL SKATEPARK..WE ALL SKATED THAT PARK.WHO EVER WAS SERIOUS ABOUT SKATEBOARDING SKATED CHERRYHILL..WE ALL HAD LITTLE HOME PARKS WE STARTED UP WITH BUT WHEN CHERRYHILL SKATEPARK OPENED SO DID OUR MINDS AND WE ALL DROVE OUR PARENTS CRAZY GETTING TO THAT PARK..

BOBBY REEVES
PEANUT BROWN
WOODSMAN FROM CONCORD DELAWARE
TODD WERNY
TOM GROHOLSKI
JIM MURPHY
STEVE HEARING
JEFF HARTSEL
JAMIE GODFREY
MIKE JESOLOWSKI
VICTOR PEREZ
TED GUENIVER
MARK GERMACK
MARK MANUTI
PAPO
PUPPET
KEITH
SUGAR BEAR
CHIP
JACK FROM SEEDS OF TERROR
ZEKE ZEGAR
STEVE EYE
BRUCE
DEAN GODFREY
ROB FROM STATEN ISLAND
THE ENTIRE CREW FROM NORTH BRUNSWICK, NJ 4H SK8 CREW.

How big was the backyard skate scene where you grew up?

THE BACKYARD SK8 SCENE IN DELAWARE WAS NICE.. I SESSIONED WITH MARK GERMACK, TED GUENIVER AND TODD WERNY THE MOST.. HE HAD A 8FOOT WIDE RAMP THE WENT VERT WITH CEMENT COPING.MARK'S RAMP AND TOM GROHOLSKI'S MINI BLUE RAMP KEPT US ALL SKATING AFTER CHERRYHILL CLOSED...I WAS 16 WHEN CHERRY HILL SK8 PARK CLOSED...THERE WHERE ABOUT 5 BACK SPOTS I HAVE SKATED THRUOUGHT MY START IN DELWARE.. SOME HALFPIPES HAD FLAT BOTTUM AND SOME DID NOT..WE STILL SKATED EVERYTHING THAT WAS AROUND...TOD WERNEY HAD A NICE RAMP ALSO...


                                 Chuck Treece taking ownership of Layback grinds and to the max.


How many ramps do you think you skated in the Northeast United States?

I HAVE SKATED ABOUT 50 RAMPS MAYBE EVEN MORE.. SO MANY OF THEM WHERE UP AND THEN A YEAR OR TWO LATER THEY WOULD BE GONE..

Any favorites?

MY FAV RAMP WILL ALWAYS BE TOM GROHOLSKI'S PLEXI RAMP HE PURCHASED FROM THE SK8 PARK IN STATEN ISLAND.. I REMEMBER TALKING TO TOM AND HIS DAD AND THEY SAID WE FOUND THIS RAMP AND WE'RE GOING TO PICK IT UP AND SET IT UP IN THE BACKYARD..WE WENT FROM SKATING THE MINI BLUE RAMP TO THE AMAZING METAL FRAMED PLEXIGLASS RAMP.. THAT RAMP CHANGED SKATEBOARDING FOREVER..

When did you get hit with the music bug and what was the first instrument you picked up?

I WAS INTO MUSIC AS SOON AS I COULD BREATHE.. I WAS ALREADY PLAYING ON A PROFFESSIONAL LEVEL AT AGE 8.. MY DADA WOULD LET ME SIT IN WITH HIS BAND WHEN THEY WOULD REHEARSE AND PLAY SHOWS.AT AGE 2 I WAS BANGING ON POTS AND PANS AND AGE 6 I HAD MY FORST DRUM KIT.... STOKED ON MUSIC

What artists did you like to skate to back in the day?

THE ARTIST I SKATED TO FIRST WERE ROCK ARTISTS, TED NUGETNT, KISS ALL THE CLASSICS THAT KIDS GREW UP ON IN THE BURBS..WHEN I STARTED CHECKING OUT PUNK MUISC AND THE SEX PISTOLS, DEVO, CLASH, 999, BUZZCOCKS, JOE JACKSON AND ON AND ON. I FELT LIKE SKATEBOARDING HAD IT'S OWN SOUNDTRACK.. NOT TO MENTION WE WERE ALL STOKED ON THE SURF PUNKS..THEY DON'T GET ENOUGH CREDIT FOR BEING THE FIRST REAL SK8 BAND..BIG UPS TO DENNIS DRAGON AND STACY PERALTA.... MY WAVE.. BAD BRAINS, JOY DIVISION, METALLICA, ARTILLERY, VOID, MINOR THREAT, SCREAM, MOTORHEAD... SO MUCH GOOD MUSIC TO SK8 TO...





You know, out of all the sports that I know of, I don’t think you can say any of them have produced as many bands or musicians as skateboarding has, why do you think that is?

SKATEBOARDING WILL NEVER EVER BE A GENERIC SPORT.. IT'S ALL ABOUT MOVEMENT..THE MUSIC CREATES HOW WE MOVE AND SKATEBOARDING IS ALWAYS CENTERED AROUND A MOVEMENT.. THE NEW MOVEMENT NOW IS GETTING SKATEBOARDING TO ALL WALKS OF LIFE SO THEY CAN ENJOY IT HOW THEY WANT TO...




Who were your first sponsors and how did you get the hook up?

MADRID SKATEBOARDS, GULLWING TRUCKS AND OJ WHEELS. TOM GROHOLSKI AND I TEAMED UP TO WRITE THESE COMPANIES..TOM HELPED ME GET IN FIRST WITH MADRID AND THEN I WROTE SOME OTHER COMPANIES AND TOM AND I PULLED EACH OTHER UP THRU ALL THE CHANGES IN SKATEBOARDING.. WE WERE KIDS WITH BIG DREAMS AND WE PROTECTED THEM WITH OUR LIVES ATTACHED TO THEM..THAT'S WHY WE BOTH STILL SK8 ALL THE TIME TODAY. WE DON’T SEE EACH OTHER THAT MUCH BUT WE DO KEEP IN TOUCH..IT'S THE SAME AS WHEN WE WERE KIDS...GET OUT THERE AND MAKE YER MARK OR GRIND SOME COPING, OR DO BOTH AND HAVE GREAT MUSIC TO LISTEN TO..DO IT ALL.. IT’S HERE FOR US TO DO IT ALL...SKATEBOARDING IS THAT TO MOST OF US..


                                             Chuck Treece setting up his next line.


What series did you skate in up north?

I SKATED THE MESS SERIES WITH TOM..WE TRAVELED IN HIS TRUCK AND WE HIT AS MANY CONTEST AS WE COULD..THAT'S WHERE WE ALL STARTED MEETING EACH OTHER.. KONA CONTEST ALSO IN 82...TONS FO GOOD FRIENDS, TONS OF GREAT PEOPLE PUTTING RAMPS UP AND DEALING WITH CRAZY ASS KIDS ON SKATEBOARDS. AMAZING TIMES...

When did you start busting out with those super bad laybacks man?

I STARTED DOING LAYBACKS WHEN I FRIST SAW SHOGU KUBO DO ONE IN A MAG..I LEARNED LAYBACKS ON A BANKED WALL AT EASY RIDER WHEN I WAS 14 AND THEN I SAW DUANE PETERS DO LAYBACK ROLL OUTS IN SKATEBOARDER MAG AND THEN WE ALL GOT TO SESSION WITH HIM AT CHERRY HILL SKATEPARK...HE WAS RIPPING THEM IN THE RIGHT HAND KIDNEY.. I DECIDED TO THROW ONE UP ON COPING...AFTER A DAYS WORTH OF TRYING THEM WHEN I WAS 15, I FINALLY MADE THE TRICK MY OWN..I HAD BERT REVERTS WIRED ON VERT FOR THE LONGEST..CHERRY HILL SK8 PARK....MANG,,THAT PLACE DID WONDERS FOR ME AND  PUSHING THE LIMITS....



Let’s get back to your earliest musical influences? What bands hyped you up so much that you knew that this was the direction you wanted to pursue?

BAD BRAINS,JIMI HENDRIX,JAMES BROWN,LARRY GRAHM,SLY STONE,STEVIE WONDER, GRAND FUNK RAILROAD, PARLIMENT FUNKADELIC AND A BUNCH MORE..ANY MUSIC THAT SOUNDED LIKE FREEDOM I GOT INTO...DEVO,THE CLASH, BASEMENT FIVE,THE PROFESSIONALS AND THE SEX PISTOLS TOO..THE ENTIRE PUNK MOVEMENT MASHED UP WITH THE HIPPIE MOVEMENT IN FUNK, ROCK, REGGEA, BLUES..MY PARENTS LISTENED TO A BUNCH OF MUSIC..PUNK WAS MY OWN TO GET INTO..IT'S LIKE ME WITH MY KIDS...THEY HAVE LISTENED TO WHAT I COULD BRING TO THEM AND NOW THEY LISTEN TO WHAT MAKES THEIR LIVES RIGHT...

                                                         Chuck Treece jamming!


 What was or is your favorite thing about music and skateboarding?

MY FAVORITE THING ABOUT MUSIC AND SKATEBOARING IS EVERYTIME WE TRY TO PIGEON HOLE THEM THEY BOTH CHANGE ON US AND THEN WE HAVE TO CATCH UP..THEY ARE BOTH NEVER ENDING DOMINANT FORCES....

Now Chuck, you’ve worked with some very talented artists in the music industry, what was your participation and whom were some of those artists?

HERE'S SOME INFO FER YAH. ALL LOVE CREATED HERE IN THIS INFORMATION..

Chuck Treece                                                                          Discography

Solo Recordings

Tent, Transform, 215 Records, 2001. Producer, writer, arranger, and all
instruments.

Happy Birthday EP, 215 Records, 1999. Producer, writer, arranger, and all
instruments.

Dreamin’, Caroline Records, 1991. Producer, writer, arranger, and all
instruments.

Studio Recordings

Leiana, Page, 2005. Producer, writer, arranger, and drums.

Avant, Interscope Records, Produced by Scott Storch, 2005. Guitar, bass, and drums.

Busta Rhymes, Produced by Scott Storch, 2005.

Nikka Costa, “Matter of Time” (King Britt remix), Virgin Records, 2005. Bass.

Sean Paul, Produced by Scott Storch, 2005.

Sister Gertrude, Ropeadope Records, 2005. Bass.

Esthero, “If the Mood” and “Fast Lane”, Warner Brothers Records, 2004. Bass and drums.

Graph Nobel, Black Corners Records/Sony Canada/USA, 2004. Bass and drums.

Tamyra Gray, “You’re a Star”, 19 Records, Produced by Scott Storch, 2004. Guitar.

Kevin Little, “Sign Your Name”, Atlantic Records, produced by Scott Storch, 2004. Bass and
guitar.

Sly Boogie, “What’s My Name”, J Records, Produced by Scott Storch, 2004. Bass.

Jazzy Jeff, Magnificent, “We Live in Philly’, BBE records, 2003. Guitar.

Kindred, Surrender to Love, Hidden Beach Records, 2003. Bass, drums, and guitars.

Appleton (formerly All Saints), “Don’t Worry” (King Britt remix), Polydor Records, 2002. Bass and
guitar.

Tommy Guerrero, Tommy Guerrero and Gadget vs. The Jazz Cannon, “Get Out of Jail Free
Card”, Function 8 Records, 2002. Drums.

Angelique Kidjo, “Tumba” (King Britt remix), 2002. Bass and drums.


Kindred, “Let it All Go”, 2005. Drums.

Kindred, “Rhythm Of Life” (King Britt remix), 2002. Bass.

King Britt, Adventures in Lo Fi, “Super Star” featuring Ivanna Santilli, “Love’s Time” featuring
Alma, BBE Records, 2002. Bass, guitar, and drums.

ObaFunke, Cosmoafrique, “Freedom”, Fivesix Media, 2002. Guitar and Bass.

Philadelphia Experiment, Remix Album, “Miles Hit” (King Britt remix), Ropeadope Records,
2002. Bass and Guitar.

Res, How I Do, “They Say Vision”, MCA Records, 2002. Drums.

Rosey, “Love”, Island Def Jam Records, 2002. Bass.

Jody Watley, “The Essence” (King Britt remix), 2002. Bass.

AM 60, “Just a Dream” (remix), Shifty Disco Records, 2001. Co-producer, bass, drums, and
guitar.

A-UN Brothers, Dash, Maxell Records, Japan, 2001. Drums.

Miles Jaye, “I’ve Been a Fool” (remix), Black Tree Records, 2001. Co-producer and drums.

McRad, Absence of Sanity, Uprising Records, 2001 re-release. Co-Producer, drums, guitar, and
vocals.

TM Stevens, Shoka Zooloo, JVC International, Japan, 2001. Drums.

Huffamoose, Shanachie Records, 2000. Drums.

The Jazzyfatnastees, The Once and Future, “The Wound” and “Unconventional Ways”,
Motive/MCA Records, 2000. Bass and guitar.

Neysa, Up and Tao, Sister Melody Records, 2000. Producer, bass, drums and guitar.

Q & the JP Struggles, Q & the JP Struggles, Struggle Free Inc., 2000. Drums, bass, guitar, and
co-producer.

Joseph Parson, Joseph Parson, Blue Rose Records, 1999. Drums.

Buck-O-Nine, Libido, TVT Records, 1998. Drums.

G. Love and Special Sauce, Yeah, It’s That Easy, Epic Records, Produced by Dave “Stiff”
Johnson, 1997. Bass and drums.

David Garza, This Euphoria, Lava/Atlantic Records, Produced by Dave “Stiff Johnson”,1998.
Bass and drums.

Other Session Recordings

The Cult, remix single, Produced by the Butcher Brothers. Bass and Guitar.

Bob Dylan, “Dignity” (remix), Columbia Records, Produced by the Butcher Brothers. Rhythm
guitar and background vocals.

The Goats, “Typical American” (remix), “Digs Dugs” (remix), “Rumblefish” (remix), “Skitzo” (co-
writer), Ruffhouse Records, Produced by Joe Nicolo. Bass and drums.

Amy Grant, “House Of Love”, A&M Records, Produced by the Butcher Brothers. Bass.

Billy Joel, River of Dreams, “River of Dreams”, Columbia Records, Produced by the Butcher
Brothers. Bass.

Pearl Jam, Live From Las Vegas special double 7”, “I’ll Swallow My Pride”. Drums.

Schoolly D, Where I’m From, Ruffhouse/Columbia Records. Bass.

Sting, “When We Dance” (Euro remix), A&M Records, Produced by Phil Nicolo. Bass.

Luther Vandross, “Love the One You’re With” (Remix), A&M Records, Produced by Phil Nicolo.
Bass.

Film and Television

Cellular, Featuring music by Lottery (with G. Love). Drums and bass.

Clueless, television series theme song. Bass.

IAM.com, Featuring music by 3 7000 9, Motive Entertainment, Directed by Spike Lee. Drums.

The Jersey Guy, independent film soundtrack, drums and percussion.

Late Night with Conan O’Brian, featuring live music by Urge Overkill. Bass.

MTV’s The Real World, Featuring music by AM60, Shifty Disco Records. Bass and guitar.

Shopping, “Water Pistol Man”, Co-written with Michael Franti (Spearhead). Guitar and bass.

White Bread, Featuring music by AM60, Shifty Disco Records. Bass and Guitar.

Live Performances

Chuck has toured all over the world with a wide variety of bands. His most recent appearances include touring with Leiana and McRad (SXSW and tour), and a performance with G. Love & Special Sauce at the Hurricane Katrina benefit and the winter X Games. He has played bass for Slighty Stoopid (2004 Tour), The Goats (Ruffhouse Records), King Britt (Ruffhouse) and Urge Overkill (Geffen) and Chrissy Hynde of the Pretenders, guitar for the Disposable Heroes of Hypocrisy, D’Angelo (Cheeba Sound/Virgin) and drums for Bad Brains (Maveric), G. Love & Special Sauce (Epic), Huffamoose (Shanachie Records), The Roots (MCA/Motive Records), Black Lily (MCA/Motive Records) backing Jill Scott, Jaguar, Kindred and the Jazzy Phatnastees, Tommy Guerrero (Mo Wax Records), Miles Jaye (Black Tree Records), Bilal (Interscope Records), Star Cullars and Lige Cury of P-Funk, AM60 (Shifty Disco), TM Stevens (NAMM Show 2001/2002/Guitar and Bass Day, Mexico City), Teddy Pendergras (Republican Convention 2000), Rosey (Island Def Jam) opening act for Melissa Etheridge, TM Stevens, Bill Dickens, Victor Bailey (Sam Ash Bass Day Clinic), Will Lee, Hirom Bullock, TM Stevens (NAMM 2002/Dean Markley Booth also a Tour for Ampeg and Crate Amps (Jay Hayes, guitar) in Mexico 2003/playing drums).



BAM! So you have been on stage at least once or twice, LOL! You are da man!
What was the last skate competition you remember skating in?

WAKING UP EVERYDAY AND GIVING THANX..THAT'S THE FIRST AND LAST COMPETITION WE ALL HAVE TO DEAL WITH..THE EVENTS IN BETWEEN ARE JUST MEMORIES TO KEEP US ALIVE..

What do you think about today’s skateboarders and the on going battle between street and vert skateboarding?

AS I SAID BEFORE SKATEBOARDING WILL NEVER LET US WIN ONE SIDE OR THE OTHER..IT'S SKATEBOARDING IF IT AIN'T ABOUT SKATEBOARDING IT'S SOMETHING I KNOW NOTHING ABOUT..SET UP A BOARD AND RIDE..WITHOUT YER HEALTH AND PROPER ENERGY AIN'T NOTHING HAPPENING..




I keep finding old Thashers with AD’s featuring you in them! Do you have copies of all that stuff?

I NEED COPIES OF ALL OF THOSE AT SOME POINT AND ALSO I NEED SOME NICE BACKSIDE AIR PICK IN POWER EDGE..WOULD LIKE TO GET A COPY OF ALL THE EVENTS I HAVE HAD A PART IN WITH SKATEBOARDING AND MUSIC.

When did you become a father and how has that affected your outlook on music and skateboarding?

I BECAME DAD AT AGE 31. LOOKING BACK ON IT NOW I FEEL LIKE I WAS 16 GOING THRU ALL OF THAT DAD STUFF...I TRIPPED ON HOW THE  WORLD CHANGED RIGHT IN FRONT OF MY FACE AND NOW MY OLDEST IS TALLER THAN ME AND IN HIS OWN BAND ALREADY..I HAVE FOUR KIDS AND I LOVE EVERY MINUTE OF DEALING WITH THE PRESSURE OF BEING THE GUY THAT I GAVE SO MUCH CRAP TO...DAD..MY DAD, MY GIRLFRIENDS DAD'SMY FRIENDS DAD..WE NEVER THINK ABOUT HOW WE GROW UP UNTIL WE HAVE TO RAISE TO TAKE CAR OF SOMEONE WE LOVE TO THE BONE. EVEN IF THE LOVE LAST FOR FIVE MUNTES..ONCE YOU FOCUS IN LIKE THAT WITH LOVE YER LIFE IS CHANGED FOREVER....

                                            Chucks beautiful Family out for some fun.



Your kids are beautiful man, I wish I had started when you did or a little earlier, I still don’t have any!

LOL!

Where are you residing these days?

PHILLY,PA

How many hours a day are you making music?

AS MANY AS I CAN FIT IN AS THE DAY GOES ON, SOMETIMES IT'S ALL IN MY BRAIN...MUSIC IS ALWAYS RECORDED REGARDLESS IF WE LIKE IT OR NOT...IT'S PERFECTING THE ART OF HOW WE RECORD MUSIC THAT ROCKS..IF ALL PEOPLE RECORDED AND NO ONE HAD A CHANCE TO LEARN AND LISTEN IN THERE WOULD BE NO MUSIC. IT WOULD ALL BE IN THE SHADOWS ON OUR MINDS.

Do you sleep with songs popping out in your dreams, or do you work songs out while you’re awake?

MUSIC COMES IN HOW THE AIR COMES IN. WHEN YOU THINK ABOUT MUSIC YOU GET CREATIVE THOUGHTS, MAKING THOSE CREATIVE THOUGHTS INTO IDEAL THAT PEOPLE CAN UNDERSTAND IS COMPLETELY SEPERATED FROM MUSIC..MUSIC IS LIFE. WITHOUT MUSIC THERE'S NOTHING...NOTHING....

Do you get to skate much anymore?

I SKATE ABOUT 2 TO THREE TIME A WEEK. I SESSION FDR SK8PARK AND ALTER ST WAREHOUSE IN PHILLY...I GET OUT TO BAM'S ONCE IN A WHILE. I ALSO I GET TO SKATE PLACES AND PARKS THAT MCRAD PLAYS...STOKED ON THAT. NOW IT'S TIME FOR THE LONGBOARD PHASE OF MY SKATING..WANNA LOBBY FOR MAKING LONGBOARD FLOW PARKS. THAT WOULD ROCK...


                                              

What’s your quiver like these days?

I RIDE A TOTALLY SK8 DECK, BONES WHEELS,ACE TRUCKS, PROJECTS GRIP TAPE AND ROBOT GUTS..I JUST LINKED UP WITH A COMPANY CALL BAMBUSA SKATEBOARDS...THEY ARE USING BAMBOO AND MAPLE TO MAKE DECKS. CHECK OUT ROBOT GUTS..THEY ARE FAMILY AND GOOD FAMILY TOO SK8RZ!

Who are still your favorite skaters?

TOM GROHOLSKI, BAM, FDR LOCALS, JR R.I.P...ALTER ST LOCALS. ALL THE PEOPLE WHO LOVE TO SKATEBOARD REGARDLESS OF WHAT TRICKS THEY DO...KIERAN TREECE, ISAAC TREECE, AND STACY PERALTA...

I want to thank you for sending me those fresh tracks from you and RES!  Killer stuff!

IT WAS AMAZING TO WORK WITH RES..WE JUST DID WHAT WE KNEW AND ALL THIS MUSIC STARTING HAPPENING IN THE STUDIO. BIG UPS TO SANTI WHITE AND MARTIN MCKINNEY FOR HAVING ON THE LP. RES ALSO...SHE IS FAMILY..PHL MUSIC..

You can keep that stuff coming all you want! LOL!

I WILL LACE YA WITH MUSIC AS IT COMES THRU....

What are your current goals?

MY GOALS ARE TO STAY HEALTHY AND TO STAY VIBRANT.ALSO TO HONOR MY PEW GRANT I JUST WON...I AM APART OF THE PEW FELLOWSHIP NOW AND ALSO AN ACTIVE MEMBER OF NARAS, THE GRAMMY FOUNDATION, BE A BETTER FATHER TO MYSELF AND MY KIDS..




Will you always skateboard?

I WILL ALWAYS SK8..IF WE DESIGN PARK FOR ALL SORT OF SKATERS THINGS WILL BE NICE OF THE BODY...IT'S LIKE BIKE RIDING, ROLLER SKATING OR WALKING.....ALL YOUTH SPIRITED EVENTS..THE GO FOR IT IS UP TO THE PERSON WHO GETS INTO THAT FRAME OF MIND...

Looking back on your youth, what memory makes you smile the most?

HAVING A SET OF PARENTS I COULD LEARN FROM AND LOOKING BACK TO LOOK ON..SO MUCH WE TAKE FOR SAKE OF THE MOMENT..OUR BRAINS WORK BECAUSE OF THE MOMENTS..IF YOU CAN SMILE YER LIVING LIFE RIGHT....

I want to thank you Chuck for taking the time to answer a few questions for Coping Block.

THANK YOU CLEO. SO STOKED YOU PUT YER LIFE ON THE LINE FOR SKATEBOARDING. WE ALL WILL BENEFIT FROM COPING BLOCK.

Any shout outs or words of encouragement for those people who read this?

ALL SHOUT OUT TO EVERYONE DOING WHAT THEY LOVE TO DO.

KEEP YER DREAMS AND GOALS MOVING..KEEP YER FAMILY IN A GOOD PLACE WHEN YA CAN..TRAVEL AND SEE THE WORLD AND MAKE HISTORY OF WHAT WE ALL CALL LIFE..

SHOUT OUT FOR DAZE

Let’s skate dude!

YEPPER


Push, Carve, Grind!

for more great Skateboarding stories please visit http://www.copingblock.com/

http://copingblock.wix.com/cleoconey

The Marty Ramos Interview in Coping Block Skateboarding Magzine!


                                               Martin Ramos Laying down a Smith Grind.




Marty where were you born?

Jacksonville, FL . . . born and raised.

Marty, how do you begin to explain how your family became a skateboarding fixture in the state of Florida?

Mom and Dad had some skateboards under the Christmas tree back in the early 70’s. I was hooked right from the beginning.  A few years later I started skating Kona.  When it closed down in 1978 Dad thought it a novel idea to buy it and make it a great place for kids and families.  It re-opened in June of 1979 and we’ve been here ever since.

By the way . . . you can see that same board that was under the Christmas tree hanging up at Kona today.

                                               A young Martin Ramos attacking the bricks.



Kona Skate Park is a dinosaur relative to how long previous skate parks have lasted around the United States.  Scientists can’t explain it either, how has Kona Skate Park survived so long?

Probably a combination of luck, timing and keeping to the root values that Mom and Dad established as a safe, fun place for kids and families.  Plus they always had full time jobs.  The skate park wasn’t our main source of income until the 1990’s.  We’ve ridden the wave of good and bad times for sure.  There is no security in skate park ownership . . . just got to roll with the punches.

Marty, how does it feel to know that a business your family started has played an indirect part in the financial success of many other lives through skateboarding?

Not really aware of anyone benefiting financially from Kona.  It’s just nice to still be here.  It seems that the park has added some accessibility for some upcoming skaters . . . but skateboarders find ways to skate regardless.

As a kid growing up around skateboarding as a family business, it couldn’t of all been roses for you.  There must have been some instances when you wanted to be as far away from that skate park as possible?

Being the owners kid can be a double-edged sword for sure.  Its’ been a great ride so far and the benefits have far outweighed any negative stuff that has happened along the way.  I moved out to Colorado in 1992 after G&S (my sponsor at the time) closed.  It felt like I needed to do something different for a while.  Ran a snowboard shop and got tons of riding in.  Eventually I came back for a multitude of reasons.  Mainly for school . . . but ended up staying because my Dad got sick.

                                      Martin and his Father during one of many Ramp repairs.



Which do you prefer, high tops, low tops, or mids?

I prefer Vans.

One thing that I always loved about Kona Skate Park was your folk’s man!
I always felt safe and secure at the Park because of them. They always remembered my name and where I was from, and which company I rode for.  You have picked up a great deal from them and I witnessed how you handled yourself at the Surf Skate Expo in Orlando like a real professional. What advice do you have for new skate park owners?

Get a real job.  Skate park ownership is 90% passion and 10% business.

My parents were passionate about people.  It just happened to be skateboarding that they got into.  They didn’t care whom you were, where you came from, how many tattoo’s you had or if you just got out of jail.  Everyone was treated with the same kindness and respect that you wouldn’t always expect at a skate
park.  Let’s face it . . . in those early days they were dealing with the dregs of society.  Some of the gnarliest dudes in town became great friends with my parents.  And they were as main stream as it gets.  Dad was an accountant and mom was the head guidance counselor at the local high school.  Not any surf or skate background at all.  They just wanted to have a place for kid’s that was fun and safe.

Thanks for the props on the event at Surf Expo.  Its’ been great to be able to pursue those opportunities as they come up.

The Tombstone has been a proving ground of sorts over many years with skaters like Duane Peters, Mark Lake, Tony Alva, Buck Smith, Shawn Peddie, Bobby Reeves, and others building their skateboarding reps through attacking that monstrosity. Who’s idea was it to build the Tomb Stone?

Not sure who came up with that one.  Mitch Kaufman probably knows.  It was already attached to the bowl when my parents bought the park.
It definitely defines the park though.  I’ve seen many a professional skater get broken off on that thing.  That and the snake run . . . it’s way faster than it looks.


                                              Martin's first drop in on Kona's Tombstone.


With the fiberglass stripped from the old half-pipe, it sits there under the sun holding lifetimes of memories and dissipating energy from sessions passed. What about that ramp and the skating that took place on it do you remember the most?

The old fiber-glassy ramp was so much more than I think people realize.  It hosted the first-ever professional vert ramp contest.  There were a few other Pro ½ pipe events before that . . . but the Kona event in 1981 was the first time there was a contest on a wooden ramp with flat-bottom and vert.  It was the first modern day vert ramp as we know it.
The first summer it was completed was in 1980.  The Variflex team was doing a nationwide tour, came to Kona, and fell in love with the ramp.  It had a plywood surface then and and guys like Eric Grisham, Steve Hirsh, Freddy De Sota, Alan Losi and Ziggy Zigler were taking all their pool tricks and doing them on a wooden ramp for the first time.  Gil Losi (owner of Variflex) and my Dad really got along well and decided to partner up and developed the Kona / Variflex Summer Nationals.  The rest is history.

As far as memories of that ramp go:
  • Really slippery
  • Wood 2x4 for coping
  • Big speed bump in the center of both walls due to all the patches
  • Bob Reeves doing huge method airs and stalled inverts
  • Buck Smith winning all the am events
  • Chris Baucom . . . well  . . . just being Chris
  • Hosoi and Gator break dancing during one of many rain delays
  • Hawk
  • All the dudes from Texas . . . “shut up and skate”!
  • The Summer National events with the top pros coming out each summer
  • The innovation and energy of those times doing what had never been done before on skateboards . . . the list of first time tricks is waaaaaaay to long.  But I will say this . . . the mute-air as we know it, was first done by Buck Smith on that ramp.  A few months later it showed up in a magazine giving someone else credit.

                                     Martin pulling a big backside air on the ancient Kona Ramp.


I remember way back in the day (28 years or so) watching you skate the half-pipe and pool, ripping it up with various Kona locals.  Who were your core local skaters back then and are they still skating today?

This list is so very long that I would hate to leave anyone out.  A lot of them still skate  . . . probably more skating than not skating.  I think anyone that was around back then know who they are.

Are you able to skate as much as you’d like these days, or does the business side keep you off your skateboard more than you’d like it to?

Its’ been really tough balancing skating and working.  Work has definitely won out over the past few years.  I keep telling myself I’m going to get back out there on a regular basis . . . but for now it’s about once a month.


You’ve always had a large PRO Shop at Kona, in fact us St. Pete guys couldn’t wait to get in there and see all your stuff back in the day.  Is it harder today to stock inventory that will move than say just ten years ago?

Retail has changed a ton over the past ten years.  But the shop has always been at the heart of the business.  Sometimes I describe the Skate Park business model as a Skate Shop with a Skate Park out back.

What area of Kona Skate Park has the biggest contingency of skaters?

Street is still king.  But the concrete kids are starting to come up.  But I think street will always be the most popular because its so accessible and the fear factor isn’t anything like pools or vert. . . . . unless you’re doing huge gaps and rails.


                                  Martin at the Grind for Life event in Cocoa Beach Florida.



Where is the Kona Skate Park Marty Ramos signature model with Kona Skate Park wheels?

Probably need to skate more than once a month to make that legit.



                                            Martin killing a backside ollie over the tunnel.



What’s your favorite fast food chain?

Not a fan of fast food.

When are you producing the script to Kona Skate Park the movie?

Ask Stacy Peralta about that one.  As far as a movie or documentary goes, I wouldn’t consider anyone else touching it other than him.  If he isn’t into it then it probably won’t be done.

Elaborate a little about your affiliation with Stone Edge Skate Park in Daytona?

I bought Stone Edge in 2003 after the concrete bowls were removed (except the 9-bowl).  Been holding on ever since.  As if it wasn’t tough enough keeping one going, but I couldn’t pass it up.  Way more of an emotional decision than a business one.  I spent so much time skating the blue ramp and hanging out with Team Glug that it was important to try and preserve it.

Would you consider taking donations to build additional new pools and bowls to replace older less skated structures at Kona Skate Park?

Please make payable to: Kona USA Inc.





                         Martin's been ripping for years! Here he is floating a lofty frontside ollie. 



Why isn’t there more prize money in skateboarding?

As an industry, skateboarding is retarded.  We are notorious for shooting ourselves in the foot time after time.  We need to realize it’s important to promote skateboarding as an industry, and create an organized, understandable path to being a professional.  Otherwise it will always be a struggle for both professionals and retailers.
It isn’t that there isn’t prize money . . . its that it’s a top feeder system.  Only supports the top one percent of professionals and everyone else is left scrambling for leftovers.


Kona has hosted so many rad events like the Lords of Dogtown viewing, Old School Skateboard Reunion, Florida Skateboard Hall of Fame Inductions, Kona Anniversary with Tony Hawk, the Bowl Riders Cup recently, Grind For Life Events, what’s next for Kona in event marketing?

It would be great to bring a nationally televised event to Kona.  With all the history, the uniqueness of the existing concrete and the passion that the industry shows for it . . . I feel it’s a winning situation for everyone that would be involved.


                            Martin enjoying a Cocoa Beach Skate Park evening Grind.


You are a businessman Marty but at your core you are a skateboarder first, who are your all-time favorite skateboarders to watch skate?

That is a tough one.  Chris Miller comes to mind first . . . but being around guys like Buck Smith and Tim Johnson is like a daily inspiration.  They are so raw and talented and bring a ton of energy to any session.

You ever just want to load up a van and drive around the country and skate different skate spots?

Every day.


                        One of those rare instances when Martin was able to go on a skate safari!



When you were a kid what was your dream skateboard set up?

One that I could spin 540 on.  Still waiting for that set up.

Pancakes or Waffles?

Blueberry Muffins.

Is there a skate park that you always wanted to skate but never got the chance to go ride ?

The Turf in Wisconsin.  Ironically they just unearthed a portion of it while some road construction was clearing land.  There is a big push to save it and it appears that I may be able to skate it after all.

Marty did you know that the first piece of press I got was in your Kona Flyer almost thirty years ago! Now you are being interviewed in my own Skateboarding Magazine.
Full circle I guess, I want to thank you and your family for being the first to recognize my skateboarding.

Dad came up with the idea for the mag.  It seems to have impacted way more people than any of us ever realized.  It was such a small thing at the time.  All about our local scene . . . but with the traffic the park received, a ton of non-locals were getting coverage as well. I can still remember that White G&S side-cut board you rode. 

Dang! Forgot about that deck!
Marty, how has your view on life changed since you became a family man yourself?

Family first.  Kids are great.  They really put things into perspective.  I was blessed to have the same two parents throughout my life.  Its important to make sure the things my parents engrained into me are carried forward in my family.
                                       
Do you have any companies or persons you want to thank or recognize at this time?

Anyone that has ever come to Kona and enabled us to survive for this long, and all the volunteers that continuously step up and help with events, camps, and contests.  But lately its’ been the support of my wife and family.  As the economy has beaten up everyone, we too have felt the pressure.  It’s like old times now with all my girls helping out on a daily basis.  Laurie (wife) is helping out with daily operations and Cassidy (16 year old daughter) has taken over with events and such.  Roxanne (6 years old) and Scarlet (4 years old) have even started working the snack bar.  It is truly a family business.

And lastly but certainly not the least . . . my Mom . . . she rocks!

Thanks for taking the time to chat with Coping Block!

Its’ been an honor.

Push, Carve, Grind!

For more great Skateboarding stories please visit http://www.copingblock.com/

http://copingblock.wix.com/cleoconey